Stewardship

Private landowners and agricultural producers (i.e., farmers and ranchers) play a critical role in providing habitat for birds and other wildlife, as well as food and fiber for people.

At Bird Conservancy of the Rockies, we believe healthy wildlife habitat and healthy human communities can more than just co-exist – they can thrive with proper management and stewardship. Our biologists and rangeland ecologists work alongside private landowners, land managers and resource professionals in local communities to build trust and foster proactive, voluntary conservation efforts.

It’s a win-win for birds and people. A diversity of wildlife habitats are improved to contribute to populations of songbirds, grouse, waterbirds and other wildlife, while farms and ranches remain working lands that support families, communities and a rural way of life.

Explore the Map!

Click a pin to view land stewardship project highlights featured in our 2020 Annual Report.

Recent Blog Posts from our Stewardship Team

May 9, 2022 in Land Stewardship, Partners

Wasps vs. Knapweeds: Biotic Control of Invasive Species

Knapweed is a common pest on disturbed land, and as a perennial plant that can reproduce both by seed and creeping roots, it is a very successful invader. This sort of creeping perennial is very difficult to get rid of even with more active control methods, like herbicides. Biotic control is an alternative strategy that may increase effective weed suppression. Gall wasps lay their eggs inside the knapweed, forming stem galls on young knapweed plants, which slow the plant’s growth, diverting nutrients from flowers and seeds. Using gall wasps as biotic control, we aim to reduce the spread of knapweed and give native species a better opportunity to compete. Restoring disturbed land is a long-term endeavor, but it has to start somewhere, and gall wasps are just one piece of the puzzle in restoring Eastern Colorado rangelands.

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March 30, 2022 in Land Stewardship

Grasslands and You

Grasslands contribute to the air we breathe, the water we drink, the foods we enjoy, and landscapes we love to explore. They offer natural beauty and rich cultural heritage, even as they feed millions and support the livelihoods of rural communities. They help purify our world by capturing water and carbon in the soil and deep underground, mitigating undesirable events like climate change, wildfire and severe drought. Despite all this, grasslands are underappreciated by many. Read on to learn more about why grasslands are important to our world, and what you can do to help ensure their conservation for future generations!

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January 19, 2022 in Land Stewardship, Stewardship

Loafing Around on a Sunday Afternoon

Northern Bobwhite quail are an important species in the plains and the eastern United States, known for their characteristic whistle, their habit of gathering in groups (known as coveys) and their white and black faces that peek out through the shrubby habitats they call home. While other game birds fly south for the winter, these short stout birds stay put. Bobwhites are indicators of rangeland health, and their presence often indicates that land managers are taking the health of the land into consideration when implementing agricultural practices. They are a charismatic species, and habitat protection and enhancements that target Bobwhites also benefit numerous other grassland species. Agricultural producers take great pride in the health of their lands, and knowing they have an iconic species like the bobwhite on their land gives them as much joy as it gives us in observing them in the field.

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For more information:

Button - Stewardship Contacts Page

Click here to visit our Stewardship Contacts page with a complete list of staff by location.

Click links below for information about:
Habitat Enhancement
Management Practices
Tools for Landowners